MANOMETRY/MOTILITY

Manometry is measurement of muscle movement and pressure within various parts of the GI tract. It is done by passing a catheter through the mouth or anus into the cavity of the organ to be studied. Manometry typically is done to evaluate motility disorders in patients. Manometry is used in the esophagus, stomach and rectum.

GI MOTILITY

GI motility refers to the movement of food, fluids, and waste through the digestive tract. Manometry is the test to measure this movement in order to properly diagnosis GERD and other gastro conditions.

TYPES OF MANOMETRY

There are two types of manometry performed at Associates in Digestive Health.  Anorectal and Esophageal, both are performed as an outpatient procedure in our offices.

ANORECTAL MANOMETRY

For patients suffering with constipation or fecal incontinence, an Anorectal Manometry test may be performed to measure the pressures of the anal sphincter muscles, the sensation in the rectum, and the neural reflexes that are needed for normal bowel movements. There are many causes of fecal incontinence or constipation. If abnormalities are present, they can be treated.


HOW IS THE TEST PERFORMED?

A bowel prep is required by using an enema at home prior to test. Your doctor will advise you of the prep needed. The day of the test a small fexible tube will be inserted in to the rectum. You may feel some slight discomfort as the tube is being inserted, but should not feel any pain. The catheter is connected to a machine that measures the pressure. During the test, the small balloon attached to the catheter may be inflated in the rectum to assess the normal reflex pathways. The nurse or technician may also ask the person to squeeze, relax, and push at various times to measure the reflex of the spincter muscles.  The measurements are recorded and the gastroenterologist will interpret the recordings that were made during the test.

FOLLOW UP

You will go home and may resume your normal diet and activities.If you think you may be experiencing any unusual symptoms or side effects, call your doctor. A follow up appointment should be made with your physician to discuss the results of the manometry test with you.

TREATMENTS

Treatment depends on how severe the problem is and what’s causing it. Generally, treatment options include:

  • Changes in diet
  • Use of medications
  • Muscle strengthening exercises
  • Surgical repair

ESOPHAGEAL MANOMETRY

THE SWALLOWING AND DIGESTIVE PROCESS 

When you swallow, food moves down your esophagus into your stomach in a process called peristalsis. Peristalsis is a wave like motion that we normally are unaware of taking place. Disruptions of these waves may cause chest pain, difficulty swallowing, or pain when swallowing.